31 Days of Elvira

31 Days of Elvira

The stars are ageless, aren’t they?

gameraboy:

Wonder Woman, “The Bushwackers”

I hope she isn’t connecting at DFW.  There are always delays.

gameraboy:

Wonder Woman, “The Bushwackers”

I hope she isn’t connecting at DFW.  There are always delays.

gameraboy:

littlebunnysunshine:

Who knew Chuck E. Cheese had promo photos?

Makes sense he’s from here in Jersey

Always good to see a picture of my former employer.

gameraboy:

littlebunnysunshine:

Who knew Chuck E. Cheese had promo photos?

Makes sense he’s from here in Jersey

Always good to see a picture of my former employer.

I’m listening to the audiobook of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein as my October read (very well narrated by Jim Donaldson).  The novel has been a favorite of mine since I was given the book as assigned reading my freshman year of high school, and it’s one of a few books I re-read every few years.  It’s also one of the few books I’d also like to sit down with the author and ask a million questions, because it’s one of the most challenging and oddly relatable books I’ve ever read.  
Neil Gaiman discussed the book at this link just yesterday.
The book is wildly different from the movie(s), but have some common elements and themes with at least the first three Frankenstein films.  While most of us were given the book to read at some point, the memory fades around the novel and is replaced by schlocky comedy bits and retreads of watered down nods to the original films.  I’d argue most folks don’t really wind up remembering the book all that well.
The book still works remarkably well 200 years after publication, and you can see the themes created by Shelley picked up and repeated endlessly in sci-fi and horror.  Frankenstein’s drive to pursue knowledge is not alien, nor his realization of a grave error caused by hubris.  The creature/ wretch’s struggle to find kindness and his murderous retaliation against mankind is all to familiar in headlines.  At minimum, it is not impossible to understand his furious frustration at being called into existence and then to feel betrayed and rejected by a world we didn’t intend to inhabit.  We’ve all been teen-agers 
Frankenstein’s struggles with the best course of action, constantly weighing the consequences, and mis-judging the possible outcomes when he goes up against a force that had nothing to lose, keeps both the scientist and his creation in ambiguous territory.  
Shelley understands motivation in a way that many writers well beyond her 21 years at the time of the novel’s publication only trick themselves into believing they’ve accomplished.  The book has divergences that feel odd and lengthy by modern standards, you do wish Shelley had used some economy in her travelogue descriptions at times, and you do get it - Victor is miserable - enough.  But even under all that, I am often left wondering if the book reflects the attitudes of the day or if Shelley intentionally made Victor a semi-unreliable narrator.  And that’s the crux of the questions I’d have for Mary Shelley.  How much are we to secretly sympathize with the wretch, even as he turns to murder - or did she expect we should agree with Frankenstein that he should have turned away from his creation?

I’m listening to the audiobook of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein as my October read (very well narrated by Jim Donaldson).  The novel has been a favorite of mine since I was given the book as assigned reading my freshman year of high school, and it’s one of a few books I re-read every few years.  It’s also one of the few books I’d also like to sit down with the author and ask a million questions, because it’s one of the most challenging and oddly relatable books I’ve ever read.  

Neil Gaiman discussed the book at this link just yesterday.

The book is wildly different from the movie(s), but have some common elements and themes with at least the first three Frankenstein films.  While most of us were given the book to read at some point, the memory fades around the novel and is replaced by schlocky comedy bits and retreads of watered down nods to the original films.  I’d argue most folks don’t really wind up remembering the book all that well.

The book still works remarkably well 200 years after publication, and you can see the themes created by Shelley picked up and repeated endlessly in sci-fi and horror.  Frankenstein’s drive to pursue knowledge is not alien, nor his realization of a grave error caused by hubris.  The creature/ wretch’s struggle to find kindness and his murderous retaliation against mankind is all to familiar in headlines.  At minimum, it is not impossible to understand his furious frustration at being called into existence and then to feel betrayed and rejected by a world we didn’t intend to inhabit.  We’ve all been teen-agers 

Frankenstein’s struggles with the best course of action, constantly weighing the consequences, and mis-judging the possible outcomes when he goes up against a force that had nothing to lose, keeps both the scientist and his creation in ambiguous territory.  

Shelley understands motivation in a way that many writers well beyond her 21 years at the time of the novel’s publication only trick themselves into believing they’ve accomplished.  The book has divergences that feel odd and lengthy by modern standards, you do wish Shelley had used some economy in her travelogue descriptions at times, and you do get it - Victor is miserable - enough.  But even under all that, I am often left wondering if the book reflects the attitudes of the day or if Shelley intentionally made Victor a semi-unreliable narrator.  And that’s the crux of the questions I’d have for Mary Shelley.  How much are we to secretly sympathize with the wretch, even as he turns to murder - or did she expect we should agree with Frankenstein that he should have turned away from his creation?

31 Days of Elvira

31 Days of Elvira

brianmichaelbendis:

Ilustración de Fiona Staples una de las artistas reconocidas en los Premios Harvey 2014. Conoce al resto de premiados aquí mismo

this issue was pretty great, as I recall.

brianmichaelbendis:

Ilustración de Fiona Staples una de las artistas reconocidas en los Premios Harvey 2014. Conoce al resto de premiados aquí mismo

this issue was pretty great, as I recall.

Frozen/ Breaking Bad Moment 

link from amandapalmer

horrorhostmagazine:

A photo of Huracan Ramirez — Possibly one of the greatest Lucha Libre images ever.

After years of wondering how one wears a trilby without looking like a @#$%ing idiot, I have my answer.  This guy makes it work.

horrorhostmagazine:

A photo of Huracan Ramirez — Possibly one of the greatest Lucha Libre images ever.

After years of wondering how one wears a trilby without looking like a @#$%ing idiot, I have my answer.  This guy makes it work.

apanelofanalysts:

I guess we’ve all been there.

apanelofanalysts:

I guess we’ve all been there.

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Sunrise Steeple
Photo by Bill Stipp (Burleson, Texas, USA); Manor, Texas, USA

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Sunrise Steeple

Photo by Bill Stipp (Burleson, Texas, USA); Manor, Texas, USA

Tell yer kids:  MONSTER SQUAD

Tell yer kids:  MONSTER SQUAD

Annual October viewing of Frankenstein and Bride of Frankenstein double-bill, complete for 2014.

Still two of my favorite movies.

These two posters hang in my living room, because we roll Frankenstein-style at my house all year long.

nathancone:

Veronica Lake is getting ready for Halloween.

nathancone:

Veronica Lake is getting ready for Halloween.